clypd to Optimize TV Campaigns for Viewer Attention using TVision Data

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New York – October 17, 2018 – clypd, the leading audience-based sales platform for television advertising, today announced the integration of TVision attention data into its TV schedule optimization platform. The integration allows users to create TV campaigns with better attention and improved effectiveness, without needing to increase overall media budgets. TVision measures eyes-on-screen attention to every second of programming and advertising on television, resulting in person-level second-by-second attention measurement. The two companies also released a study titled “Beyond Impressions: Using Data to Improve Advertising Effectiveness,” to demonstrate how attention can be incorporated into TV campaigns.

“If viewers pay attention to commercials, they are more likely to be influenced by advertising messages and ultimately act,” said Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group. “This integration of TVision attention data into clypd’s planning tools is a necessary step in enabling TV advertisers to reach eyeballs and avoid serving ads to an empty room.”

“Television advertising still remains among the most effective marketing channels,” said Pete Doe, Chief Research Officer at clypd. “What is critical is for the TV industry to demonstrate and improve advertising effectiveness. Optimizing campaigns for attention is an important element of that. By teaming up with TVision, we were able to create a case study that combines clypd’s optimization capability with TVision’s attention work.”

Traditionally, media has been planned on reach and frequency, but technological advancements now allow advertisers to measure and act on behavioral factors like attention. TVision attention scores can be employed seamlessly in the clypd platform, enabling the creation of campaign plans that yield more attentive viewers within the framework of existing campaign goals. Advertisers benefit from increased effectiveness and media owners gain a better understanding of the value of their inventory.

“TVision has data on what viewers truly paid attention to on TV across every single ad airing in the past three years. This historical data enables us to track trends over time and identify areas that are likely to generate high attention, yielding value to advertisers and networks, ” said Dan Schiffman, Chief Revenue Officer and Co-Founder of TVision Insights. “We know that high attention leads to business outcomes, whether that’s brand awareness, store visits, or sales. The next step is to make attention data transactional. By utilizing data showing what viewers pay attention to in clypd’s platform, marketers can optimize plans for real eyeballs, increase campaign attention and drive results.”

To download a copy of the case study, please go here.

Pumpkin Spice Sells a Latte of Goods

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It seems that every year, more fall activities creep in before Labor Day. More and more schools start early. And this year, Starbucks released the Pumpkin Spice Latte three days before Labor Day weekend, the earliest in the drink’s 15 year history.

It was 94 degrees in New York City on August 28, this year’s release date for the Pumpkin Spice Latte (aka the PSL). The temperature had no impact on Starbucks’ decision to release the seasonal drink that day. Rather, it was the money. Read More

Regression to the Mean: What is it and Why Does it Matter for TV Advertising?

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What can Magic Johnson teach us about advanced TV advertising? He has appeared in many commercials over the years (including AT&T, Coca Cola and MasterCard), but it is his sporting career that gives us important insights into how performances vary and how even hall of famers struggle to maintain the same level of results year after year. And this struggle to maintain performance applies to many things, including TV shows.

Earvin ‘Magic’ Johnson burst onto the scene in 1979, becoming the first and only rookie to win the NBA Finals MVP award. He also holds the NBA record for assists per game (APG), averaging 11.2 across his career in regular season play. When we look at his APG stats by year, we see he improved through the first few years of his career, then hit a high point, culminating in a league-leading 13.1 APG in 1983-4. Heading into 1984-5 it would have been natural to think that he might continue improving, with an APG of 14 or even 15 as the logical next step. But it didn’t happen like that: Magic performed well in the following years, but he never got above 13 again. Read More

clypd Collaborates with Industry Consortium ATSG to Define Standards for Advanced Audience Targeting in TV; Nielsen Among First to Adopt

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The Advanced Targets Standards Group (ATSG), whose members include Disney|ABC and ESPN, AMC Networks, A+E, CBS, CIMM, and Discovery, announced significant progress in bringing advanced audiences to the TV advertising marketplace

New York, NY – September 13, 2018 – The Advanced Target Standards Group, a consortium of leading network TV programmers, along with CIMM’s Advanced TV Committee, today announced that the Calculation Principles for Advanced Targets, published last year, will be implemented in Nielsen’s Advance Audience Posting API.

“We know that the currency is evolving and Nielsen will remain at the center of providing the industry with the metrics needed to transact,” said Kelly Abcarian, SVP of Product Leadership, Nielsen. “The ATSG Calculation Principles are a great first step towards bringing consensus to advanced audience measurement and we are pleased to be among the first to implement these standards. We are committed to bringing independence and consistency to this space, and as a result, we are innovating to ensure advanced audiences can be monetized in a seamless way.”

Keith Kazerman, SVP Client Solutions of Discovery Networks commented, “We’ve been using these calculation methods in our Discovery Engage advanced audience deals for over 18 months. Because of the ATSG’s work on standards, we and our clients are confident that our advanced audience deals are being measured accurately and consistently.”

“Getting the numbers right is critical, but with the proliferation of measurement and data in the market, accuracy and transparency are not always guaranteed. The ATSG Calculation Principles reflect broad industry consensus about how advanced audiences should be counted in linear TV” said Pete Doe, Chief Research Officer at clypd. “Additionally, they are open source, as we all agreed that was crucial for the development of the industry. We’re excited that Nielsen has chosen to implement them.”

The ATSG has also released new resource materials on the ATSG website, including:

  • First-Party Advanced Audience Data: Considerations and Guidelines

This document lays out the key issues that need to be addressed with the use of first-party data, such as target size, utility, completeness and consistency, and the fidelity of the data when matched to relevant audience measurement data.

ATSG member David Ernst of A+E Networks commented, “We are seeing more and more interest from advertisers and agencies wanting to incorporate their own data into their national TV advertising. The opportunities here are great, but there are also challenges with first-party data that need to be considered. This new ATSG document provides a comprehensive but readable overview of key considerations and guidelines for anyone working in this space.”

  • ROI/Effectiveness POV

The use of advanced audiences in national TV campaigns has coincided with a focus on effectiveness. The ATSG has published a point of view on effectiveness measurement for TV.

“Any measurement that improves our understanding of how TV advertising delivers on advertiser objectives is welcome,” said Tom Ziangas of AMC Networks. “For television, that has to include a clear view of the advertising objectives and the metrics that are being used to measure campaign success. TV works at all levels of the effectiveness funnel and any effectiveness measurement needs to reflect that. It takes a first impression to get a last click.”

  • Data Labeling

The ATSG has created a data labeling framework for TV measurement data, to help guide data users through the increasingly crowded TV measurement data environment that includes Panel, STB, OTT and ACR data sets. This data labeling operates at two levels – a top-line description of the basic attributes such as sample size, coverage and projectibility, and a more detailed assessment that covers areas such as reported metrics, data granularity, and reporting frequency and latency.

ATSG member Jonathan Steuer, Chief Research Officer at Omnicom Media Group, first suggested the data labeling concept that has now been embraced across the industry. Steuer said of the initiative, “The ATSG focus on TV data sets for these labels complements other initiatives in play in the digital space and provides a useful set of considerations for anyone deciding which data set can best inform better TV advertising outcomes for their clients.”

In other news, the ATSG announced that Howard Shimmel, President, Janus Strategy & Insights, LLC and former Turner and Nielsen executive, has joined the group in an advisory capacity.

Shimmel stated, “I’m extremely happy to be advising ATSG. Their efforts will be instrumental in helping the industry to transition to audience buying and selling, and maximizing the benefits that sellers and buyers gain.”

A Little R-E-S-P-E-C-T for Aretha, the Commercial Performer

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Few people have the depth and breadth in their career in commercials to have appeared in ads for cars and gasoline, candy bars, a credit card, an internet service provider, for McDonalds and Pizza Hut, and for both Coke and Pepsi. When Aretha Franklin died earlier this month, she left behind not just a legacy in music, but one in advertising as well.

Aretha was, in fact, involved in a pioneering effort in advertising on the radio. One of her first appearances, a 1969 radio ad for Coca-Cola, was a part of their “Things Go Better with Coke” campaign. Read More

Maximizing Reach in Linear TV, or How to Choose the Location of a New Coffee Shop

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As audience-based linear TV campaigns become more common, we are seeing that the default goal of campaign optimization is shifting from maximizing advanced target impressions to maximizing advanced target reach (or at least, to have more control over it). Therefore, it is important to understand what reach optimization really is, why it is a difficult computational problem, and what approaches can be taken to approximate a solution in a timely fashion. In this post, I focus on the problem itself. Later on, I will focus on solution approaches.

The way we approach problems in life is informed by our past experiences. In my case, my take on the reach optimization problem starts with what happened at the beginning of the 2013-2014 academic year at the University of Delaware. I was a postdoctoral researcher there at the time, and all the community including faculty, staff, and students were very excited. Our excitement was not due to the return to classes, or because we would see friends again. We were excited because a Starbucks coffee shop had opened on campus! Read More

Jerry Seinfeld Brings Back Classic ‘Think Small’ VW Campaign

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The print ad for the new season of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee caught my eye earlier this week. It took me back to Doyle Dane Bernbach’s iconic “Think Small” campaign.

My father, Tom Yobage, was a creative director at Doyle Dane Bernbach, and worked with Helmut Krone and many of the legends who created the campaign. I remember being a little kid, going to work with my dad a few times a year, seeing the ads on poster board around his office.

“Think Small” was one of the most famous ads in Doyle Dane Bernbach’s VW Beetle campaign in the early 1960s. Art director Helmut Krone and copywriter Julian Koenig teamed up to create what Ad Age deemed, in 1999, the #1 campaign of the previous 100 years. Read More

ALF, Numb3rs, MacGyver, Misfits: Meet Our New Engineering Teams

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For the last several years, clypd’s Engineering teams have been named after colors. The theme incorporates the red, green, and blue inputs of an RCA component cord, and is also found on clypd logo. We have had to deviate once or twice to add a new hue, like when our team in India grew, and took the name Team Indigo. And when our Data Science team chose Maize, thanks to a passionate University of Michigan grad. Recently, we decided it was time to change up the names.

What does a company with TV in our DNA do in a case like this? A company that works with national broadcast and cable networks, whose office is decorated with film reels, and old TV sets from the 1970s and 1980s? We named the teams after TV shows, of course! Read More

Prince Harry: Still America’s Favorite Royal Prince

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I am a regular viewer of ‘The Royals’ on E! and recently binged seasons one and two of ‘The Crown’ on Netflix. In elementary school, my friends and I woke up one morning at dawn to watch Lady Diana marry Prince Charles. I also sat glued to the coverage of her funeral a few years later. Given that viewing history, perhaps it’s no surprise that I also woke up silly early a few weekends ago to watch the Royal Wedding. But could my viewing be so on trend as to account for the other 29.2 million people who tuned in?

By any measure, airing something that 29.2 million Americans (according to Nielsen), want to watch – on a Saturday morning at 7am Eastern – is impressive. Sure, the wedding’s numbers were dwarfed by the Super Bowl (103 million) but it was watched by more viewers than the Oscars (26 million) and it did double the season finale of one of last year’s highest-rated shows, the viewing phenom “Game of Thrones” (12 million). Read More

clypd Granted Patent for Demand Target Detection

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Today, clypd was granted a new patent (9,973,794: “Demand Target Detection”), an invention for inferring the intended target audience of an advertiser’s requested TV media plan.

We are thrilled to have secured this patent soon after our patent for cross-platform targeting, as it contributes to our continued success in inventing and building innovative solutions to address the changes happening in the media and advertising works. Read More