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Throwback Thursdays

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When the Academy Awards Turned to Television

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

This Sunday night, Hollywood stars will make their yearly journey to the Dolby Theatre for the 89th Academy Awards, while audiences eagerly await the announcements of the film industry’s most coveted awards.

These days, we take it for granted that the Oscars will be televised, but that wasn’t always the case. It wasn’t until 1953 that NBC aired the 25th Academy Awards live on television, although it had been covered on live radio since 1930.

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Kickin’ it with the Budweiser Clydesdales

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A weekend trip to snowy Vermont and New Hampshire last weekend, two days of covered bridges and northern New England history, left me with George Clooney’s voice in my head.

Woodstock, VT, is a small town about a three-hour drive north from Boston and about five hours from New York City. As of the 2010 census, its population was just over 3,000 people, spread across 44 square miles. Set in Vermont’s scenic Green Mountains, the town and surrounding village are postcard-perfect, filled with historic buildings and houses, small farms, quaint inns and old taverns.

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Tom Brady, MVP On and Off the Field

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Super Bowl LI cemented one thing for sure: Tom Brady is one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. Of course, we’re a little biased here at clypd, with most of the team in Somerville (although we do have quite a strong and vocal New York contingent).

On Sunday, Brady and the Patriots managed to come back from the biggest point deficit in Super Bowl history to clinch their 5th title. For Brady’s performance, he received the MVP award in a very awkward award ceremony with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

As one of the star athletes of match, Brady also made a couple of appearances while not on the field during the Super Bowl, during its commercial breaks.

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This is SportsCenter

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As I read the news this week that Wieden and Kennedy and ESPN were parting ways after a 25 year partnership, I kept thinking, “follow me, follow me to freedom”. W+K was responsible for the long running “This is SportsCenter” campaign, among other great work for ESPN. The campaign, which began in 1994, mixed sports, celebrity, and a behind-the-scenes look at the high-rated sports news program.

“Follow me to freedom” comes from one of my favorite spots in the campaign. In this spot, SportsCenter’s production team engages in a Y2K test. Things don’t go well, and in seconds, alarms sound, the lights go out, athletes loot the place. Mark McGwire takes a baseball bat to a computer. Jonathan, the University of Connecticut mascot, a dog, absconds with some awards. The show’s announcers read highlights by candlelight.

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Presidential Inaugurations, from Truman to Trump

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Last Friday, Donald J. Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer held a press conference shortly after to announce that Trump’s inauguration held the largest audience “both in person and around the globe,” kicking off a colorful discussion on crowd size and digital viewership.

In terms of television viewership, Trump’s inauguration didn’t even come close to the most-viewed. The event was seen by 30.6 million viewers across 12 networks.

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64 Years Ago, ‘Today Show’ Ushered In a New Era of TV

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If you watch TV in the morning, enjoy the personalities and news as you prepare for the day ahead, but treat the program as background noise, you are one of many millions of people who start your day as Pat Weaver hoped. When the “Today Show” launched 64 years ago last weekend, these were some of its founding goals.

Weaver was a television executive who got his start in radio and later worked at an advertising agency. He took this prior experience and applied it to TV. In just seven years at NBC (1949-1956), Weaver left a huge mark as one of the biggest innovators in television programming, developing and championing programs “Today Show,” “Tonight Show,” “Meet the Press,” and “Your Show of Shows.”

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George Foreman: Boxing Champ, Marketing Champ

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On Tuesday, George Foreman, professional boxer, ordained minister, and entrepreneur, turned 68 years old. Born in 1949 in Texas, Foreman had a troubled childhood until he found his calling – boxing. By 1968, he joined the US Olympic boxing team and captured the gold medal at the 1968 US Olympics in Mexico City.

Shortly after, Foreman went pro and took the heavyweight title from “Smoking” Joe Frazier in 1973. Foreman’s reign ended when he lost to Muhammad Ali in the legendary match “Rumble in the Jungle” in 1974. Twenty years later at the age of 45, Foreman shocked audiences by recapturing part of his title from 27-year-old Michael Moorer. Foreman retired for good in 1997 at the age of 48 with a final record of 76 wins, 5 losses, and 68 knockouts.

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Television: Uniting America Since 1951

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It has been said there is nothing like TV to bring people together. Whether a national emergency or a national event, everyone is together, in the same living room, watching the same thing. The Super Bowl. Man on the Moon. The OJ Car Chase. New Year’s Eve.

New Year’s Eve. Hundreds of thousands of people pack into tiny pens in Times Square to wait for the Ball to drop. Millions of people watch for that same moment, on TV. In the hours leading up to midnight, the various networks cut away to acts and talent performing across town and across the country in Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Key West, among other spots. In many cases, the networks go to a split screen format, allowing us to see footage from two cities at the same time.

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Carrie Fisher, Space and Hollywood Royalty

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This past week, we experienced the loss of a legendary individual who made an indelible impact on pop culture. Actress, writer, producer, and comedian Carrie Fisher passed away on Tuesday from complications from a cardiac arrest at the age of 60.

Carrie Fisher is most remembered for her defining role as Princess Leia in the Star Wars franchise. She played a strong female warrior that could hold her own against Stormtroopers, Jabba the Hutt, Darth Vader, and anyone else who came in her path. In 2015, she reprised her role as Princess Leia, who grew up and ascended to General Organa in “Star Wars: A Force Awakens.”

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A Wonderful Time to Watch ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, my TV watching turns into a holiday movie marathon. There are so many good ones, many of which I make a point to watch every year, out of tradition.

If “It’s a Wonderful Life” is also on your holiday playlist like it is on mine, you may have a clerical error that took place 45 years ago to thank.

December 20, 1946: the theatrical release of “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Director Frank Capra was one of Hollywood’s A-list directors in the 1940s. Everything he directed touched the heart and was a huge success, movies such as “It Happened One Night” and “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”. In 1946, he directed a black-and-white film starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed that looked like it would be another winner: “It’s a Wonderful Life”.

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