Category

clypd Blog

Remember When Amazon Just Sold Books?

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

When Amazon officially opened for business on July 16, 1995, the only thing they offered were books. Within just one month, Amazon had shipped books to all 50 US states and to 45 countries. Bezos’ aim and motto was to “get big fast,” and as we know the company is now an ecommerce mega-mall, selling so much more than books.

As we rely increasingly on the giant company for our personal shopping as well as business needs, it’s hard to remember a time just about twenty years ago when Amazon sold only one product: books. Because today, “There’s virtually nothing left that they haven’t touched,” said Kelly O’Keefe, professor at the Virginia Commonwealth University Brandcenter. Read More

Cool Whip is Still Cool After 50 Years

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Cool Whip. It puts the exclamation mark on apple pie, strawberry shortcake, ice cream, and so many other summer desserts. It keeps a long time in the refrigerator, can serve as an ice cream substitute, and helps make cakes and frozen pies look airy.

Cool Whip went from new product to top seller quickly. In just two years, it was the biggest seller and most profitable product in the Birds Eye portfolio of General Foods. (For those interested in corporate family trees, General Foods later merged with Kraft/Philip Morris, then became part of Altria until Kraft was spun off from Altria in 2006. Ten years later, Kraft merged with Heinz, forming KraftHeinz.) Read More

Slipping ‘n Sliding into Summer

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

For children of the 80s, few things evoke stronger memories of summer than Slip ‘N Slides, Super Soakers, Fla-Vor-Ice, and if you live in New England, Hoodsie cups.

If you were the lucky kid to have a Slip ‘N Slide in your backyard, you could expect to be friends with the entire neighborhood. There was something so simple, yet so liberating about running at full speed and then falling to your stomach to slide down a soaking wet (and sometimes soapy), yellow plastic runway.

Despite the craze in the 80s, the Slip ‘n Slide was created by Robert D. Carrier in 1960. Carrier was a Californian father who would come home from work to find his 10-year-old son and friends sliding down his painted concrete driveway – exciting for the kids but extremely worrying for the father. Carrier happened to be an upholsterer for a boat-seating manufacturer, and so like any good dad, he created a safer version for his kid and friends. Read More

Hot Town, Summer in the City

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

With temperatures in the 90s over the last few days, ice cream has been on my mind and no doubt on the minds of others. I’ve also been thinking about what I would do for a Klondike bar.

The original Klondike bar was created in 1922, on a small dairy farm in Mansfield, OH. There, the Isaly family, immigrants from Switzerland, made the bars by dipping squares of ice cream into pans of their beloved, melted Swiss chocolate. The bar’s genesis came from an attempt to make an ice cream product specifically for adults. They were made only in Islay stores, so their availability and distribution was limited. Read More

Carrie, Charlotte, Miranda, and Samantha: HBO’s Wonder Women

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

“Sex and the City,” the groundbreaking HBO series that ran for six seasons and still remains in syndication today, premiered this week in 1998.

Set and filmed in NYC, the series chronicled the lives, trials, and triumphs of friends Carrie, Charlotte, Miranda, and Samantha – four single, 30-something professional women. The series’ production process differed dramatically from network norms, and SATC (as nicknamed by fans), defied expectations about both the popularity and commercial viability of a series produced by and for a subscription cable network. Read More

LeBron James vs. Steph Curry: Who’s Got the Best Kicks?

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Tonight is a big night in the basketball world. It’s Game 1 of the NBA Finals in Oakland, California – and for the third year in a row, the Cleveland Cavaliers are facing off the Golden State Warriors.

The star power in this year’s finals is practically blinding. Between the two teams, there are seven MVP award winners, almost certainly future inductees into the Hall of Fame, and the biggest names in the league: LeBron James, Steph Curry, Kyrie Irving, Kevin Durant, and more.

When people talk about Cavs vs Warriors, the conversation inevitably turns to LeBron James vs Steph Curry – early comparisons have been made to the Larry Bird-Magic Johnson matchup. James has four MVP awards under his belt, two of them when he was with the Miami Heat. Steph Curry won the award for last two years. Both will be vying for the recognition this year. Read More

A Long, Long Time Ago, Star Wars Changed Movie Marketing Forever

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Today marks Star Wars’ 40th anniversary. On May 25, 1977, “Star Wars: A New Hope” began its run across silver screens around the US. The film kicked off a global phenomenon, including a wildly successful franchise that has licensed over $20 billion worth of goods.

With the eighth installment, “The Last Jedi,” coming out this December, Lucasfilms (now owned by Disney) is certainly leveraging the big anniversary. Vanity Fair just released four special covers for its May magazine featuring “The Last Jedi” cast, including the late Carrie Fisher. The spread included previews into the newest Star Wars film, including new cast members. Read More

Let’s Be Upfront

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

A marketer identifies the features and benefits of their product that are deemed important to a select group of target customers. The marketer hones in on the customer’s TV viewing habits, and perhaps also pinpoints some of the places they are likely to walk past in a typical day. This has been going on for years, indeed more than half a century. Only fairly recently though has the marketer been a television network and the target customer an ad buyer. This is Upfront Week.

Upfront Week is a business tradition unique to advertising sales, specifically TV ad sales, that has evolved since its start in the 1960s. In the late 1950s, new series premiered on broadcast networks at various times across the year and upfront negotiations were aligned to the studio’s development cycle. According to Ad Week, at the time, upfronts began in February after Washington’s Birthday and finished within a few weeks.

Read More

Jingsong Cui on Forecasting in the Television Industry

By | clypd Blog, Technology | No Comments

In this special Q+A, we talk with Jingsong Cui, clypd’s Head of Media Analytics. We discuss the importance of forecasting, clypd’s approach to forecasting, and what the future brings to forecasting.

What’s your background?

I have been working with data and models throughout my career. In graduate school, I studied economics and used econometric models to analyze social and economic data. After getting my Ph.D,  my first job was working for a marketing research company called @Futures. I led a team of statisticians to build forecasting models for pharmaceutical clients. The company was acquired by Nielsen in 2010. Within Nielsen, I worked with several industry verticals, across Buy (which focuses on consumer spending) and Watch (which focuses on media consumption). I have always enjoyed doing applied research and using data to solve real business problems. Read More