this-is-sportscenter

This is SportsCenter

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As I read the news this week that Wieden and Kennedy and ESPN were parting ways after a 25 year partnership, I kept thinking, “follow me, follow me to freedom”. W+K was responsible for the long running “This is SportsCenter” campaign, among other great work for ESPN. The campaign, which began in 1994, mixed sports, celebrity, and a behind-the-scenes look at the high-rated sports news program.

“Follow me to freedom” comes from one of my favorite spots in the campaign. In this spot, SportsCenter’s production team engages in a Y2K test. Things don’t go well, and in seconds, alarms sound, the lights go out, athletes loot the place. Mark McGwire takes a baseball bat to a computer. Jonathan, the University of Connecticut mascot, a dog, absconds with some awards. The show’s announcers read highlights by candlelight.

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Presidential Inaugurations, from Truman to Trump

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Last Friday, Donald J. Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer held a press conference shortly after to announce that Trump’s inauguration held the largest audience “both in person and around the globe,” kicking off a colorful discussion on crowd size and digital viewership.

In terms of television viewership, Trump’s inauguration didn’t even come close to the most-viewed. The event was seen by 30.6 million viewers across 12 networks.

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64 Years Ago, ‘Today Show’ Ushered In a New Era of TV

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

If you watch TV in the morning, enjoy the personalities and news as you prepare for the day ahead, but treat the program as background noise, you are one of many millions of people who start your day as Pat Weaver hoped. When the “Today Show” launched 64 years ago last weekend, these were some of its founding goals.

Weaver was a television executive who got his start in radio and later worked at an advertising agency. He took this prior experience and applied it to TV. In just seven years at NBC (1949-1956), Weaver left a huge mark as one of the biggest innovators in television programming, developing and championing programs “Today Show,” “Tonight Show,” “Meet the Press,” and “Your Show of Shows.”

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George Foreman: Boxing Champ, Marketing Champ

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

On Tuesday, George Foreman, professional boxer, ordained minister, and entrepreneur, turned 68 years old. Born in 1949 in Texas, Foreman had a troubled childhood until he found his calling – boxing. By 1968, he joined the US Olympic boxing team and captured the gold medal at the 1968 US Olympics in Mexico City.

Shortly after, Foreman went pro and took the heavyweight title from “Smoking” Joe Frazier in 1973. Foreman’s reign ended when he lost to Muhammad Ali in the legendary match “Rumble in the Jungle” in 1974. Twenty years later at the age of 45, Foreman shocked audiences by recapturing part of his title from 27-year-old Michael Moorer. Foreman retired for good in 1997 at the age of 48 with a final record of 76 wins, 5 losses, and 68 knockouts.

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Television: Uniting America Since 1951

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

It has been said there is nothing like TV to bring people together. Whether a national emergency or a national event, everyone is together, in the same living room, watching the same thing. The Super Bowl. Man on the Moon. The OJ Car Chase. New Year’s Eve.

New Year’s Eve. Hundreds of thousands of people pack into tiny pens in Times Square to wait for the Ball to drop. Millions of people watch for that same moment, on TV. In the hours leading up to midnight, the various networks cut away to acts and talent performing across town and across the country in Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Key West, among other spots. In many cases, the networks go to a split screen format, allowing us to see footage from two cities at the same time.

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Carrie Fisher, Space and Hollywood Royalty

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

This past week, we experienced the loss of a legendary individual who made an indelible impact on pop culture. Actress, writer, producer, and comedian Carrie Fisher passed away on Tuesday from complications from a cardiac arrest at the age of 60.

Carrie Fisher is most remembered for her defining role as Princess Leia in the Star Wars franchise. She played a strong female warrior that could hold her own against Stormtroopers, Jabba the Hutt, Darth Vader, and anyone else who came in her path. In 2015, she reprised her role as Princess Leia, who grew up and ascended to General Organa in “Star Wars: A Force Awakens.”

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A Wonderful Time to Watch ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, my TV watching turns into a holiday movie marathon. There are so many good ones, many of which I make a point to watch every year, out of tradition.

If “It’s a Wonderful Life” is also on your holiday playlist like it is on mine, you may have a clerical error that took place 45 years ago to thank.

December 20, 1946: the theatrical release of “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Director Frank Capra was one of Hollywood’s A-list directors in the 1940s. Everything he directed touched the heart and was a huge success, movies such as “It Happened One Night” and “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”. In 1946, he directed a black-and-white film starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed that looked like it would be another winner: “It’s a Wonderful Life”.

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Alan Thicke, America’s Favorite Canadian Dad

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

On Tuesday, TV personality Alan Thicke passed away at the age of 69. He passed away from a heart attack while playing ice hockey with son Carter. Thicke was best known for his role as in the classic 80s sitcom, Growing Pains, but his talents were widespread, from hosting talk shows, songwriting, pageant-hosting, and being father to a massive pop star, Robin Thicke.

Despite playing the all-American father on Growing Pains, Thicke was actually a Canadian and his career began up north. Thicke hosted a number of Canadian TV game shows and then later hosted his own talk show in the early 1980s called The Alan Thicke Show. However, he didn’t rise to international stardom until he starred in Growing Pains, which debuted on ABC in 1985 and ran until 1992.

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Jolly Green Giant: $754 Million Dollar Man

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, there is a buzz around the return of a certain mythical figure, able to stop children in their tracks, bring adults to attention, and known to bellow “Ho Ho Ho”.

This time around though, it’s not a man in red with a white beard. This one is green. He is currently on a cross-country road trip and his goal is to change children’s behavior and maybe some grown ups’ habits too.

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