its-a-wonderful-life

A Wonderful Time to Watch ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, my TV watching turns into a holiday movie marathon. There are so many good ones, many of which I make a point to watch every year, out of tradition.

If “It’s a Wonderful Life” is also on your holiday playlist like it is on mine, you may have a clerical error that took place 45 years ago to thank.

December 20, 1946: the theatrical release of “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Director Frank Capra was one of Hollywood’s A-list directors in the 1940s. Everything he directed touched the heart and was a huge success, movies such as “It Happened One Night” and “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”. In 1946, he directed a black-and-white film starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed that looked like it would be another winner: “It’s a Wonderful Life”.

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Alan Thicke, America’s Favorite Canadian Dad

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

On Tuesday, TV personality Alan Thicke passed away at the age of 69. He passed away from a heart attack while playing ice hockey with son Carter. Thicke was best known for his role as in the classic 80s sitcom, Growing Pains, but his talents were widespread, from hosting talk shows, songwriting, pageant-hosting, and being father to a massive pop star, Robin Thicke.

Despite playing the all-American father on Growing Pains, Thicke was actually a Canadian and his career began up north. Thicke hosted a number of Canadian TV game shows and then later hosted his own talk show in the early 1980s called The Alan Thicke Show. However, he didn’t rise to international stardom until he starred in Growing Pains, which debuted on ABC in 1985 and ran until 1992.

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Jolly Green Giant: $754 Million Dollar Man

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, there is a buzz around the return of a certain mythical figure, able to stop children in their tracks, bring adults to attention, and known to bellow “Ho Ho Ho”.

This time around though, it’s not a man in red with a white beard. This one is green. He is currently on a cross-country road trip and his goal is to change children’s behavior and maybe some grown ups’ habits too.

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Coke’s Polar Bears Come Back for the Holiday Chill

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

With Thanksgiving and Black Friday behind us, we slide head-first into the holiday season. There are few advertising campaigns as enduring as the Coca-Cola polar bear spots. The cute, animated polar bears, slipping and sliding in the Artic stole hearts (and sold) Cokes.

And for the first time since 2013, Coca-Cola is bringing back the polar bears on select Coca-Cola packages, including Coke, Coke Zero, Diet Coke, and coke Life. While the polar bears will grace packages of the the soda, they don’t make an appearance in this year’s holiday TV campaign, called “A Coke for Christmas.” The spot features a teenager as he surprises people in his community with bottles of Coke, saving his last bottle for St. Nick.

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Black Friday Kicks Off Start To U.S. Holiday Shopping

First Comes Thanksgiving, then Black Friday

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Thanksgiving quickly approaches – we have a less than a week left to brine that bird and expand our stomachs, a tradition that many of us hold near and dear to our hearts. Another American tradition? Saving up our paychecks to spend on Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year.

Post-Thanksgiving sales have occurred since before it was deemed “Black Friday.” In 1939, the nation’s retailers requested that President Franklin D. Roosevelt move Thanksgiving day. That year, Thanksgiving fell on the last day of November, giving shoppers little time for their holiday shopping. Roosevelt acquiesced, and moved up the holiday to to November 23rd, giving retailers the opportunity to let the holiday sales loose on consumers a week early.

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butterball hotline

Talking Turkeys

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Thanksgiving is something most of us associate with happiness and relaxation. It is a time for gathering with family and friends, enjoying an abundance of great food, doing a little traveling, and for many it is a four-day weekend to boot.

But it is also a time of panic and fear for many, an event that prompts an estimated 10,000 people to call the Butterball Turkey Hotline.

Thanksgiving is two weeks away but the Butterball Turkey Hotline has been open for ten days.

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Baseball and the Smashing of Curses

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | One Comment

After a 108 year drought, the Chicago Cubs finally clinched the World Series title last night. In a nail-biter Game 7 that went into extra innings (and a rain delay), the Cubs won 8-7 against the Cleveland Indians. Billy goats and black cats be damned, the curse was finally lifted.

Billy goats? Black cats? Are we still talking about baseball? For those not as familiar with the famously superstitious ways of baseball fans and players, let’s backtrack – all the way to 1945, Game 4 of the World Series at Wrigley Field in Chicago.

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To Vote is to Exist

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Milton Glaser is one of America’s most famous graphic and poster designers. While his name may not be familiar, his work will be.

Among his designs are I ♥ NY, the cover art for Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits album, and the Brooklyn Brewery’s logo. He has also designed restaurants, newspapers, and supermarkets.

One of his most recognizable works is the I Heart New York logo. In the 1970s, New York City’s crime rate was sky high, it was considered too dangerous to walk around safely in many neighborhoods, and the city stood on the verge of bankruptcy. Ad agency Wells Rich Greene and Milton Glaser were selected to design a logo to be used in a campaign which would hopefully increase tourism and morale.

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Forecasting Audiences: It’s Essential, But No One Said It Was Easy

By | clypd Blog | No Comments

Linear TV is a futures market: deals are agreed ahead of campaigns being aired, usually with an agreement that a particular audience level will be delivered. For this to work as efficiently as possible, good audience forecasts are essential. Where forecasts are wrong, the media owner either over delivers, effectively giving away audiences for free, or under-delivers, requiring additional inventory to be added to the campaign for free.

Forecasting is a lesson in humility because no one gets it right all the time (Exhibit A: the media’s current favorite geeky guru, Nate Silver, who failed to predict that Donald Trump would be the Republican presidential nominee). No forecast is perfect and no forecasting model is good for all time, because the landscape is always changing.

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Bob Dylan: Musician, Nobel Prize Winner, and Pitchman

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | One Comment

Last week, legendary singer-songwriter and musician Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature, surprising literary circles and delighting music fans around the world. Dylan is only one of two musicians to ever be awarded the coveted prize; Bengali polymath won the prize in 1913. The Swedish Academy said that Dylan “created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition,” comparing his work to that of Homer and Sappho.

Dylan is certainly unique among the Nobel prize winners – he may also be one of the very few prize winners to play the role of pitchman. Back in 1965, as one of the country’s foremost counterculture icons, Dylan famously told a reporter that if he ever sold to a commercial interest, it’d be “ladies garments.”

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