aprilandcalf

April’s Springtime Miracle for Toys R Us

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

My Saturday morning began like many of yours: with an email alert that it looked like April was finally, really in labor this time. The baby was coming soon!

Like millions of others, I tuned in to see the miracle of birth…of a little baby giraffe, at a not so little 5’ 9” tall, 175 pounds.

April needs little further introduction, and no last name. Her pregnancy has been watched via live stream from the Animal Adventure Park’s “Giraffe Cam” by hundreds of thousands of us at a time. Even in the middle of the night. For months, we’ve been sticking our necks out waiting for this little thing. Read More

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Ain’t Nobunny like the Cadbury Bunny

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

The grass outside is turning green and growing, tulips are blooming, which means… ’tis the season to devour some Cadbury eggs. If you’ve turned on the TV recently, chances are you’ve seen the classic Cadbury bunny spot.

Cadbury Creme Eggs may be one of Britain’s most famous imports. In 1824, John Cadbury opened up shop in Birmingham, UK where he sold tea, coffee, cocoa, and drinking chocolate. In 1923, the company released its cream-filled eggs, but the Cadbury Creme Eggs that we know and love weren’t released until 1971.

The chocolate, creme, and fondant-filled eggs quickly became an Easter must-have (possibly nestled next to some marshmallow Peeps). Its popularity was helped along by the classic clucking bunny TV campaign, which originally debuted in 1982.

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ATSG-LOGO

clypd-led Standards Group Releases Advanced Audience Targeting Guidelines for Linear TV Advertising

By | clypd in the News | No Comments

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The Advanced Target Standards Group, a consortium of eight of the leading network TV programmers working with clypd, today announced a set of guidelines and best practices for the use of advanced targets in linear television advertising.

The acceleration by advertisers and agencies in the use of advanced data sources to bring more precision to national TV advertising has prompted leading television networks to address the complexities associated in moving beyond buying audiences strictly on an age and gender basis.

The Advanced Target Standards Group (ATSG) has been meeting regularly since August 2016 to address priority issues. Chaired by Pete Doe, Chief Research Officer at clypd, a sell-side platform for audience-based TV advertising, the members of the group have focused on a number of industry-related challenges including:

  • Target definition and sizing
  • Availability and suitability of advanced target data to enable campaign planning, activation and reporting
  • Calculation methodologies that deliver transparent and accurate estimates
  • Standardization across network groups

The ATSG has created guidelines for the use of advanced targets in linear TV and a detailed specification of calculation methodologies for managing advanced audience segments, to ensure marketplace consistency for buyers across media owners. The guidelines are available to be viewed at www.atsg.tv.

Some best practices include:

  • National linear TV is a brand building medium: a suggested minimum advanced target size is 10 million (about 3% of the US).
  • Age and gender targets are fairly consistent year-on-year but advanced target definitions (e.g. brand purchase, attitudes) may be less so. Any deal needs to consider the possible or probable inconsistency of any advanced audience target in size and composition.
  • There are many TV viewing data sets that can be used for advanced target deals. Most of these data sets do not have MRC accreditation, so buyer and seller need to be careful in understanding the pros and cons of the data source.

With regard to calculation methods, the group has aligned on approaches for calculating basic metrics for advanced targets, such as target population sizes, impressions and ratings, across a wide variety of data sources. While these are taken for granted when using standard demographics, advanced target data sets present different challenges including varying population sizes, data latency and classification completeness.

“Having a standard approach to measuring the performance of advanced targets across media owners is essential to make these deals work smoothly and at scale. Alignment among a group of industry leaders like this provides a meaningful step forward,” said Pete Doe, Chief Research Officer at clypd. “The goals of the group align with those of the OpenAP initiative announced recently – to make advanced audience buying and selling more accessible, consistent, and transparent for the entire industry. I’m excited to be a part of this consortium, helping to move the advertising ecosystem forward.”

zip file pictogram  on mechanical construction

How We Deal with Broken ZIP Files: Pick the Lesser of Two Evils

By | clypd Blog, Engineering | No Comments

clypd’s workflow involves offline processing of files from our clients and partners. They drop compressed ZIP files to our SFTP servers which are then picked and processed by our workers. The processed data is crucial in powering clypd’s advanced audience targeting platform. Because these files are critical to our business, we have monitors that ensure correct parsing and transformation of the files.

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1280_jeo_alex-738030

53 Year-Old Game Shows for $1000, Please

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Answer: America’s longest running game show premiered on this day in 1964.
What is “Jeopardy”?

With many more than 7,000 episodes aired, “Jeopardy!” has won a record 33 Daytime Emmy Awards. In January 2001, TV Guide ranked the show number two on its “50 Greatest Game Shows” list—second only to ”The Price Is Right.” Additionally, “Jeopardy” has gained a worldwide following thanks to running in slightly different versions in Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden, Russia, Denmark, Israel, and Australia. The American version of ”Jeopardy” airs around the world as well. The series, which used to run weekly, has been airing daily for 33 years.

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power rangers

The Power Rangers that Keep Going

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

The new “Power Rangers” adaptation may seem like a reboot, but Power Rangers as a franchise has been alive and well since the original TV show kicked off in 1993. “Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers” debuted in August 1993 on Fox Kids, the programming block for children that aired on Fox from 1990 to 2002. An immediate hit, kids all across the country rushed home from school, grabbed a bag of 3D Doritos and Gushers, and turned on the TV to watch “Mighty Morhpin’ Power Rangers” six days a week.

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cops

Whatcha Gonna Do When Sheriff John Brown Comes for You?

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

The opening lines of that song have been played on TV at least 1,500 times, every Saturday for the last 28 years. The reggae beat of its distinctive theme song, Inner Circle’s “Bad Boys”, is well known to us now, and will continue to be: Season 30 began taping in February this year.

“COPS” began its run on the Fox Broadcast Network on March 11, 1989. The network had just launched a few years prior, in October 1986. It took a chance on “COPS” after other major networks passed on it, jumping on the opportunity in the middle of a five month-long strike by the Writers Guild of America. The strike had crippled TV production in the summer of 1988. A reality-based show that required no writers and was inexpensive to produce was a perfect recipe for the new network.

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original barbie

58 Years Ago, Barbie Changed Little Girls’ Lives Forever

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

58 years ago today, Barbara Millicent Roberts made her debut at the American Toy Fair in New York City. Also known as Barbie, she stood 11 inches tall, sported blond hair and wore a black and white swimsuit, complete with accessories like sunglasses, high-heeled shoes, and hoop earrings.

Ruth Handler, cofounder of Mattel, created Barbie after seeing her young daughter ignore her baby dolls and play make-believe with paper dolls of adult women. Handler named her new doll after her daughter, and it became the first doll in the US with an adult body.

Barbie debuted at an opportune time – the 1950s saw the post-war boom and the rise of the suburban middle class. Children were becoming a new group of citizens called “teenagers,” and television was taking off as an advertising medium. In 1955, Mattel became the first company to air commercial sports to children with its sponsorship of the “Mickey Mouse Club.” Mattel used its sponsorship to introduce Barbie to America.

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Google Bumps TV/Video on its Axis with YouTube TV: Part 2

By | clypd Blog, Industry Chatter | No Comments

Television advertising remains the most powerful branding vehicle as there is no better way to realize the reach of that medium. Digital advertising, while lacking the same reach does provide opportunity for specific targeting, granular measurement, ad unit customization and interactivity. The lean-back environment of the television viewer does not necessarily lend itself for an interactive ad experience, but the digital delivery of YouTube TV does allow for ads customized on the viewer’s audience characteristics or on their behavior.

The initial carriage agreements provide YouTube with ad sales rights for the inventory which otherwise would have been earmarked for local advertising by the MVPD. There is also an undisclosed revenue share between YouTube and the content owner for those YouTube-sold ads. There will likely be further coordination between these parties involving addressable ad targeting for the content owner and bartering of ad inventory.

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YouTubeTV

Google Bumps TV/Video on its Axis with YouTube TV: Part 1

By | clypd Blog, Industry Chatter | No Comments

Google’s announcement of YouTube TV last week is one that will be seen as an inflection point for the world of media and advertising.

YouTube TV, originally code-named “Google Unplugged” is the latest “Virtual MVPD”, joining DirecTV Now, PlayStation Vue, Sling TV and offering a set of live TV channels through digital means (as opposed to traditional MVPDs who deliver television to the home through their own infrastructure like satellite, telecommunications lines and terrestrial cable) for a monthly fee.

While each of these players have their own unique features, they are generally providing the same set of offerings: a “skinny bundle” of TV networks, available for viewing on any internet connected device at a very competitive price point as compared to the larger bundle of many channels from your local cable provider. Basic feature set similarities aside, YouTube TV, by nature of its parent company, will create waves, not ripples across the sea of TV viewership, distribution, and advertising.

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