All Posts By

Alison Yobage

A Wonderful Time to Watch ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, my TV watching turns into a holiday movie marathon. There are so many good ones, many of which I make a point to watch every year, out of tradition.

If “It’s a Wonderful Life” is also on your holiday playlist like it is on mine, you may have a clerical error that took place 45 years ago to thank.

December 20, 1946: the theatrical release of “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Director Frank Capra was one of Hollywood’s A-list directors in the 1940s. Everything he directed touched the heart and was a huge success, movies such as “It Happened One Night” and “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”. In 1946, he directed a black-and-white film starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed that looked like it would be another winner: “It’s a Wonderful Life”.

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Jolly Green Giant: $754 Million Dollar Man

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

As happens in December, there is a buzz around the return of a certain mythical figure, able to stop children in their tracks, bring adults to attention, and known to bellow “Ho Ho Ho”.

This time around though, it’s not a man in red with a white beard. This one is green. He is currently on a cross-country road trip and his goal is to change children’s behavior and maybe some grown ups’ habits too.

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Talking Turkeys

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Thanksgiving is something most of us associate with happiness and relaxation. It is a time for gathering with family and friends, enjoying an abundance of great food, doing a little traveling, and for many it is a four-day weekend to boot.

But it is also a time of panic and fear for many, an event that prompts an estimated 10,000 people to call the Butterball Turkey Hotline.

Thanksgiving is two weeks away but the Butterball Turkey Hotline has been open for ten days.

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To Vote is to Exist

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Milton Glaser is one of America’s most famous graphic and poster designers. While his name may not be familiar, his work will be.

Among his designs are I ♥ NY, the cover art for Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits album, and the Brooklyn Brewery’s logo. He has also designed restaurants, newspapers, and supermarkets.

One of his most recognizable works is the I Heart New York logo. In the 1970s, New York City’s crime rate was sky high, it was considered too dangerous to walk around safely in many neighborhoods, and the city stood on the verge of bankruptcy. Ad agency Wells Rich Greene and Milton Glaser were selected to design a logo to be used in a campaign which would hopefully increase tourism and morale.

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The Little Mints Making Big Noise

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

Tic Tacs. In recent days, thanks to newly surfaced comments made ten years ago on a hot mic by controversial GOP candidate Donald Trump, they have been front page news.

First produced in 1969 with a less catchy name, Tic Tacs were rebranded just a year after being on the market. They are named after the distinctive sound produced when they rattle in their hard plastic container.

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I’ll Have What He’s Having – An Arnold Palmer?

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

When Arnold Palmer died on Sunday at the age of 87, he left behind a rich legacy. He was a successful golfer, a charismatic ambassador of the sport, and a pioneer in the field of sports marketing and endorsements, a man with an eponymous drink.

Fellow golfers called him the King. From 1958 to 1964, he was an incredibly dominant player, and the face of golf in the US. He won seven majors and had 62 total victories on the PGA tour. His good looks, charming personality, and success on the course grew the game’s popularity immensely in that time. He was locked in a three way rivalry with Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player in most of that era, but tended to have the crowds supporting him. The legions were called Arnie’s Army.

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Hair Apparent: Image is Everything

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

The Open Era in tennis refers to a period that began in 1968, when Grand Slam tournaments allowed professional players to compete alongside amateurs. I think of it as the phenomenal two week stretch in late August, when my TV viewing focuses almost exclusively on watching tennis at the US Open. Matches air from morning well past midnight, taking place just a few miles from midtown Manhattan.

The US Open, the fourth and final tennis Grand Slam of the year and the only one played in the United States, takes place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, Queens.

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The (Baseball) Boys of Summer

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | One Comment

August 26th of this year marked the 77th anniversary of the first televised major league baseball game. The game aired on W2XBS, which became WNBC-TV. Called by announcer Red Barber, the matchup featured the Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn.

According to History.com only an estimated 400 people in the New York area had access to a TV at the time. But the broadcast coincided with the 1939 World’s Fair, taking place in nearby Flushing Meadows (now home of the USTA National Tennis Center and the US Open). At the event, RCA introduced TVs to American consumers. And with the telecast of the Reds vs Dodgers, NBC’s broadcasting business began.

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Behind the Covers at the Olympics

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | No Comments

We have celebrated Team USA medals across a range of sports and margins of victory during the Olympics. Some Olympians were household names before they won, some will be in our homes for weeks to come thanks to Special K cereal boxes.

I have noticed that most of the medal winners were born well before the cover songs used in so many Olympic spots were released. One of the first spots to grab my attention used a cover of Cyndi Lauper’s “True Colors.”

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Right Here, Right Now

By | clypd Blog, Throwback Thursdays | One Comment

Last weekend, I cued “My Hometown” on my Sony Walkman and headed to Greenwich, Connecticut for my high school reunion. Also playing in my head were Jesus Jones’ “Right Here, Right Now” and Scorpions’ “Winds of Change,” two songs inspired by world events of the era.

In the weeks leading up to the reunion, I thought about what had changed, and what remained the same. A lot stayed the same. After all, we were going to a restaurant we used to go to then, still owned by a classmate’s father. Would the same people be playing the Breakfast Club roles of criminal, athlete, basket case, princess, and brain? Had external forces that happened in high school, college, and the decades that followed changed us?

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